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Artists Save Waves

TEEN ARTIST CREATES MURAL AT WET’N’WILD HAWAII

Stephanie Hung

All-day discounted admission

Mural unveiling - Saturday, October 17

10:30am - 3:30pm | 12:00 unveiling

$25 all-day discounted admission by entering promo code WAVE online*

Proceeds of ticket sales to benefit Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii

*Purchase a general admission at $49.99 using the promo code WAVE to receive discount.  Ticket applies to adults and children 3 years & older.  Kids 2 years & under are free and do not require a ticket to enter.  Fees for parking, food, beverages, in-park rentals, retail, pay-per-play attraction, and other in-park services are not included with the price of admission.  Valid on same day visit only.  May not be combined with any other offer, coupon, promotion or discount.  Offer not transferable or exchangeable.

Artists Save Waves

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Wet’n’Wild Hawaii is unveiling new artwork this week, painted by Punahou School senior Stephanie Hung, whose innovative painting creates awareness about saving Hawaii’s ocean waters and environment. She created a nonprofit called Artists Save Waves, which is partnering with Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii (SCH) on the Wet’n’Wild mural.

“With everything going on right now, I have the opportunity to create something that could visually make people happy and also serve to remind them that our beaches and delicate ecosystem need some love and aloha,” Stephanie says. “The timing couldn’t be more perfect.” 

The vibrant colors and sea life painted in the mural includes some fish and a hammerhead shark that Stephanie researched were indigenous to Hawaii. SCH, a local nonprofit on O Ľahu with a mission to inspire local communities to care for their coastlines, will unveil the painting using pieces from a derelict fishing net that volunteers recently recovered from Kailua. Since their inception nearly a decade ago, SCH has removed over half a million pounds of debris with the help of 40,000 volunteers, hosted over 150 beach cleanups, and have reached over 42,000 students. SCH removes this marine debris that can range from small microplastics to large ghost nets, like the one being used for the unveiling that weighed in at nearly 10,000 pounds when initially pulled off the beach.

“Getting people out to the beaches to experience a cleanup, and the energy of a community driven to make a difference, is what inspires us the most. Stephanie’s artwork is a testament to the impact something like a beach cleanup can have on our future generations. It is an honor to see the beauty of Hawaii’s oceans and beaches captured in this mural. Continuing to share that story helps to inspire youth and families at the waterpark to connect to it as well,” says Rebecca Mattos, Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii’s Director of Education & Outreach.

SUSTAINABLE COASTLINES